DCSIMG

Westerton Primary switches on to electrical recycling

Westerton is one of several primary schools in Leeds that have had banks placed in their playground where parents can dump small electrical goods, rather than taking them to the tip for landfill. It's all part of Leeds City Council's recycling push.
Pictured L/R: Cllr Jack Dunn, Callum Howley, Imogen Dulling, Neve Jackson, Matthew Young and Headteacher Jim Reid

Westerton is one of several primary schools in Leeds that have had banks placed in their playground where parents can dump small electrical goods, rather than taking them to the tip for landfill. It's all part of Leeds City Council's recycling push. Pictured L/R: Cllr Jack Dunn, Callum Howley, Imogen Dulling, Neve Jackson, Matthew Young and Headteacher Jim Reid

PRIMARY schools across the Morley area are helping to boost recycling rates by encouraging parents to ditch their unwanted electrical goods without resorting to the tip.

Recycling banks for unwanted gizmos and gadgets have been placed in a number of Leeds schools, including Drighlington, Cottingley and Westerton in Tingley.

The bottle-bank style containers have appeared in 15 playgrounds in total so parents and carers can drop off their broken or unwanted small electrical items when they drop the kids off at school.

Another 15 are in the process of being installed.

Everything from clapped out computer keyboards, toasted toasters, wrecked radios, out of order irons, has-been hair straighteners and busted battery powered toys can be left in the new WEEE (Waste Electronic and Electrical Equipment) banks.

It’s hoped the banks will help people recycle even more electronic items - 1,247 tonnes of small electrical gizmos were recycled in Leeds in 2011/12 - and support the ever-increasing network of Leeds schools striving to become more sustainable.

The items will be collected by the council’s partner Weeelink, and broken down so that the valuable metals and plastics can go on to become car parts, pipe, wire and new mobile phones.

Coun Mark Dobson, Leeds City Council’s executive member for the environment, said: “We’ve got to make it as easy as possible for people to recycle so combining the walk to school with an opportunity to recycle makes perfect sense.

“Gadgets go out of fashion so quickly or simply break but we have to ensure that the valuable resources they contain can be recycled. That way, we can reap the environmental and financial benefits.

“I know our schools are really embracing a green ethos and the Weee banks will allow school staff, pupils and parents to go that little bit further while caring for the environment.”

An incentive scheme will see the school that collects the most waste electronics receive a cash prize that they can invest in other green projects.

 

Comments

 
 

Back to the top of the page