Tingley Athletic raising cash to save lives

Darren Price, Michael Asquith, Mark Reid and Andrew Powell with the Tingley Athletic team raising funds for a defibrillator.
Darren Price, Michael Asquith, Mark Reid and Andrew Powell with the Tingley Athletic team raising funds for a defibrillator.
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An under 8s football manager from Tingley is undertaking a 150-mile walk to Bridlington and back to raise money for a defibrilator.

Tingley Athletic are hoping to raise awareness about the importance of using the equipment, and to raise the £5,000 needed to buy a defibrilator and train staff to use it.

Mick Asquith raised over £250 in just 24 hours after setting up his justgiving page at www.justgiving.com/defib/

He said: “Funds are always tight at grassroots football and many clubs are struggling each year to simply survive so cannot afford life saving equipment such as a defibrillator.

“But having had an internal defibrillator fitted I know how important such a piece of equipment can be in saving someone’s life.”

The walk from Tingley to Bridlington will take 44 hours over three or four days in spring next year and Mr Asquith is encouraging members to join him as he takes part.

The team decided to invest in the equipment after 15-year-old Melissa Smith died playing for Cadley FC in Lancashire last month.

Tingley held a minute’s silence in rememberance of Melissa, who suffered a heart attack while playing in Greenside.

Helen Colton, a parent co-ordinator from the club, said: “Defibrilators can potentially save lives, it is recommended that all clubs have them. The more clubs that have them, the safer the children are.”

Defibrilators deliver a shock, used on people having caridac arrests.

A defibrillator machine gives clear spoken instructions and users don’t need training.

They can be found in public spaces like shopping centres, gyms or schools and are there for anyone to use on someone in cardiac arrest

Once in position, the defibrillator detects the heart’s rhythm.

Every second counts as after a cardiac arrest, every minute without CPR and defibrillation reduces someone’s chance of survival by 10 per cent.

When you call 999, the operator can tell you if there’s a public access defibrillator nearby.

If you come across someone who is not breathing or breathing erratically, the most important thing is to call 999 and start CPR.