Leeds 10K: How to stay hydrated during the scorching temperatures this Sunday

This weekends scorching temperatures increases the risk of dehydration
This weekends scorching temperatures increases the risk of dehydration

This Sunday, July 8, will see thousands of people take to the streets of Leeds as part of the annual 10K race, but this weekend’s scorching temperatures increases the risk of dehydration.

The weather on Sunday in Leeds is expected to reach highs of 26°C and lows of 17°C , with the day starting off warm and sunny.

This Sunday, July 8, will see thousands of people take to the streets of Leeds as part of the annual 10Krace (Photo: James Hardisty)

This Sunday, July 8, will see thousands of people take to the streets of Leeds as part of the annual 10Krace (Photo: James Hardisty)

At 07:30, the race office, baggage store and assembly areas will be opened to participants, where the temperature will already be around 17°C with sunshine expected.

When the mass warm up begins at 09:10 the temperature is expected to have increased to around 21°C with pure sunshine, just in time for the race beginning at 09:30.

The temperature is then expected to continue increasing, reaching 24°C during the race and participants are been advised to stay as hydrated as possible.

Here’s how to stay hydrated during the Leeds 10K

When you sweat during a run, the fluid you lose must be replaced or your body becomes dehydrated and therefore less efficient.

A common mistake is consuming too much water in the days and hours before the race starts, which can then make you thirsty at the start line because the body releases a diuretic hormone to bring your fluid levels back to normal.

You should sip regularly before the race and if you feel thirsty this indicates that you’re already dehydrated.

Competitors are advised to ensure that they consider the effects of dehydration and drink plenty of fluids before after and during the race in order to compensate, especially during the warmer weather.

The Leeds Run For All Race Guide explains that practicing drinking on training runs can help with hydration as ‘hydration is a fine balance’.

It states not to start the event dehydrated, but to ensure that you drink through the event according to your thirst. The guide also points out that you may not need to drink at every drinks station.

It is advised to drink half a pint (around 250ml) of water or sports drink in the half hour before the start, drinking 500ml from the time you wake up until the start of the race.

Drinks which include sodium are better retained by the body.

It is also important to not drinking too much water, as this can be dangerous.

You should drink when you feel the need to and avoid gulping large volumes of fluids before, during or after the race.

After the race finishes you should not drink large amounts of water, instead rehydrating gradually over the next 24 to 48 hours.

Leeds 10K water stations

During the race, bottled water has been provided by the Asda Foundation and will be available at dedicated stands throughout the race and at the finish.

At the 3.8km marker you’ll find the first Asda Foundation water station at Cardigan Fields.

The second Asda Foundation Water Station will be at the 6.7km marker on Kirkstall Road.

Water will then be available after you have finished the race.

If you dislike carrying anything around your waist or on your back a typical handheld bottle holds up to 20 ounces of fluid and includes an adjustable strap to help keep it in place as you run.

These bottles usually have a minimalist approach to storage, with just enough room in the strap’s pocket to place electrolyte tablets or a gel.

Multiple-bottle belts also allow for hands-free running and accommodate a variety of fluids. There is also usually an extra pocket where you can store energy bars, gels and keys.


For more information about the Leeds 10K visit: runforall.com/events/10k/leeds-10k/